Awardees

CATHERINE DULAC | 2021 NOMIS Awardee

Catherine Dulac is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, the Higgins Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology and the Lee and Ezpeleta Professor of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University in Cambridge, US. The NOMIS Award is supporting Dulac’s investigation of how the fundamental need for social interaction is generated and regulated by specific brain activity. Using cutting-edge genetics, transcriptomics, physiology and imaging approaches, she aims to uncover the neural basis underlying the instinctive drive for animals to interact with each other.


ROBERT EWERS | 2021 NOMIS Awardee

Robert (Rob) Ewers is professor of ecology at Imperial College London, UK. The NOMIS Award is enabling Ewers to create a computer simulation of one of the world’s most complex ecosystems: a tropical rainforest. By conducting virtual experiments inside the virtual rainforest to address ecological questions that cannot be addressed through empirical observations, Ewers’ research will advance our understanding of how rainforest systems perpetuate themselves and gain insight into their ability to resist the ever-increasing pressures that people place upon these ecosystems.


RONALD M. EVANS | 2020 NOMIS Awardee

Ronald M. Evans is professor at and director of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies’ Gene Expression Laboratory. The NOMIS Award is enabling Evans to investigate the mechanisms of cooperativity between interconnected networks including the brain, endocrine glands, gut, liver, immune cells and the microbiome. He is also exploring the use of exercise mimetics to prevent neurodegenerative diseases.


ANTHONY HYMAN | 2020 NOMIS Awardee

Anthony (Tony) Hyman is group leader at and a director of the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, Germany. The NOMIS Award is supporting Hyman’s investigation of the physical-chemical basis by which intrinsically disordered proteins phase separate. Using this knowledge, he is studying the roles of phase separation in physiology and disease.